Thursday, April 21, 2016

A POST IN PROCESS The Feminine Art of Breast feeding






































Sylvester






Marmion dbl


richartz virgin



Tanya folkk art
















































max extension


 below Inuit

 

 

 MArmaion


 RIBERA


ANCIENT STATUE 2 INFANTS
 V IRGINMARY HARPROCRATES






PICASO BEASTFEEDING


Eisenman  Parick Pepsi




eiseman

Horace Bristol


cezanne hortense

Daumier
 
 beast italy orf sicily







Saturday, March 26, 2016

HUNGER, STARVATION and FASTING: Abuse, Deprivation and ART



The world has experienced hunger, famine, starvation, conditions usually resulting from war,
oppression, or economic disasters. Artistic renderings of these experiences certainly belong amidst an examination of food studies.

 Artists have responded to this human suffering in a number of media: painting, stained glass, sculpture, film and photography.  All of these appear in the images below. Ironically, there are cartoons which capture the deadly messages of hate,xenophobia and dispair.

Fasting, however, is a different enactment, often as a spiritual statement in accordance with cultural norms. One example is the medieval stained glass window, below, and 3  versions of Jesus' temptation during his forty-day fast in the wilderness.  The modern paintings by Spencer and Micheli represent contemporary interpretations, A - D

Fig. A Medieval stained glass panel, master Severin, Upper Rhine area,Germany. artist unknown

Fig. B
Sandro Botticelli
1482 
Christ's Temptation in the Wilderness (Baroque)

Fig. C
Below: Stanley Spencer (b. UK,1851-1959)


Fig. D

  Jason Micheli, 20th century
                       fig. 1
 



fig. 1 Roy Ferdinand (b. 1959 - 2004) painted the tough New Orleans neighborhoods where he shared his life on the streets with drug dealers and junkies, pimps and whores. His uncompromisingly realistic style can be unsettling in its brutal and sexually explicit depictions of an inner-city "gangsta" lifestyle. 

- See more at: http://www.outsiderfolkart.com/outsiderart/a-l/Roy-Ferdinand-Biography.html#sthash.PyKBlYRz.dpuf





Fig. 2  The Famine Remembered
 The Famine Remembered: Lessons from Ukraine’s  Golodomor "golod=hunger) and Soviet Communism.” The presentation will feature Acton’s director of research, Samuel Gregg, and the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art’s education committee chair, Luba Markewycz. Markewycz will share her exhibit, “Holodomor Through the Eyes of a Child,” composed of artwork created by contemporary children throughout Ukraine.

 


                 Fig. 3

                                                                              
Above: Francisco Goya (Spain)   Carnivore Prado (Flesh-Eating Bird) Los Disastrous de la Guerre No 76
Fig. 4    Goya, Francisco The Disaster of War, 1810-1820
Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (b. 30 March 1746 – 16 April 1828) was a Spanish romantic painter[2] and printmaker regarded both as the last of th
Enterrar y callar (Bury them and keep quiet). Atrocities, starvation and human degradation described as the "prodigious flowering of rage".

Below: Disasters of War
 
                                                  


fig.5: Starving Buddhas, 17th century


Fig. 6  Sakayamuni Buddha practising austerity 



fig. 7  Gary Larsen, cartoonist (b. Tacoma, WA, 1950) THE EVER-POPULAR DONNER PARTY SNOW DOME. The actual traveling group became marooned in he Sierras, near [now] Donner Lake and resorted to cannibalism, 1846-47. Larsen presents them as an entertaining desk ornament.

 


Daniel MacDonald, below:       Fig. 8


   “An Irish Peasant Family Discovering the Blight of Their Store,” an 1847 painting by Daniel Macdonald. Credit National Folklore Collection, University College Dublin.
 
    HAMDEN, Conn. — It is called An Gorta Mor, or the Great Hunger, an evocative term that still fails to convey the full horror of the Irish potato famine, perhaps the single worst catastrophe in 19th-century Europe. Between 1845 and 1852, Ireland lost more than a quarter of its population to starvation, disease and emigration, while its English overlords hemmed, hawed and, in at least one prominent case, cited God’s will. 



Fig. 9  Eviction [of Irish Peasants] Scene, 1850




The Hunger Artist  (Ein Hungerkunstler), 1922
by Joan M. Wolk
 Kafka depicts a hunger artist in the act of "hungering".4  The dilemma of the hunger artist is that he not only refuses to eat in the practice of his art, but also because he cannot find any food he liked. Several studies have drawn parallels between Kafka's fictional hunger artist with real-life hunger artists5 while others regard Kafka's Ein Hungerkünstler as an allegory of the artist and ascetic saint.6  It is significant to note that the Modernist sensibility at the beginning of the 20th century influenced Kafka's study of psychology even though Kafka was not a Freudian.7
 

    The hunger artist is doomed to be unhappy because he depends on others’ understanding to validate his performance, which is, by his own description, “beyond human imagination.” He feels deep disdain for his spectators, but because the nature of performance art requires spectators, the hunger artist is tied to the people he seeks to evade. He is, in a sense, a misfit in a showman’s position, and he comes to depend on the praise and wide-eyed amazement of his spectators as if they themselves were the food of life. When he experiences their suspicion, cynicism, and indifference, he becomes frustrated, unable to understand that being an artist often means being alienated from others. Only at the end of his life does the hunger artist seem to approach an understanding of the paradox that defines his existence. At this point, he no longer thinks that “the world [is] cheating him of his reward,” but rather that his aspirations could never be rewarded in the world n which.

Fig. 1
Kathy Kolwitz, BREAD!  Hunger


fig. 13   Komski, Jan (b. Bircza, Poland, 1915 – 2002) Roll Call



fig. 14   Jan Komski - Scraping the Pot



fig. 15

Famine Memorial, 
Dublin, Ireland, 1997
'Famine' (1997) was commissioned by Norma Smurfit and presented to the City of Dublin in 1997. The sculpture is a commemorative work dedicated to those Irish people forced to emigrate during the 19th century Irish Famine. The bronze sculptures were designed and crafted by Dublin sculptor Rowan Gillespie and are located on Custom House Quay in Dublin's Docklands.






Fig. 16    Friedman, David Autobiographical sketches, 1940-44 from Lodz Ghetto,


 


                  FIG. 17       Man with a Star

FIG. 18
 

FIG. 19  A family in the Bronx is visited by a generous cousin.They devour fried chicken on the street and there are no left-overs.






FIG. 20
Russian artist Sergey Tchekhonine (1878-1936)
Born Sergey Vasil'evich Tchehonine
2 February 1878
Valdayka
Died 23 February 1936
Paris



TCHECKHONINE,  Poster (Union of Art Workers Aids the Starving, 1921)



Speigelman, Art (b. Sweden, 1948 - 1972)
Author of MetaMouse, 1991


Spiegelman has edited magazines and has drawn famous covers for The New Yorker. "As an art form, the comic strip is barely past its infancy," he once wrote. So am I. Maybe we'll grow up together
Illustration from the original MAUS strip

FIG. 22  Poster

FIG. 23

Edgar Argo, (b. Missouri, 1893 - 1971) Starving Artist Sale

Cartoonist: Edgar Argo   Catalog number: 33700276








Fig. 25
Novella 
Lan Samantha Chang  (b. Appleton, WIS) HUNGER:A Novella and Stories (W. W.Norton, 1998) gutsy immigrant Asian stories
Artists Anonymous

Fig. 26

FILM: 
 Pudovkin, Vsevolod Illarionovitch,   "HUNGER" [golod, golod, golod] , 1921 (also The Mother, 1926)
Vsevolod Pudovkin,

Nationality: Russian. Born: Vsevolod Illarionovitch Pudovkin in Penza, 16 February 1893 - Riga, 1953). Education: Educated in physics and chemistry, Moscow University

One of the very earliest Soviet film directors of propaganda films such as The End of St. Petersburg and The Mother


Fig. 27  


FILM:
Rocha, Glauber  (b. Bahia, Brazil, 1939-19819), WRITER/director (1964. Portuguese: Deus e o Diabo na Terra do Sol;( literally, God and the Devil in the Land of the Sun) is a 1964 Brazilian film.



HUNGER & STARVATION: esthetics of hunger give way to anthropophagy in (Black God,White Devil, 1964)   Fictionalized account of the adventures of hired gunman Antonio das Mortes, set against the real life last days of rural banditism. The movie follows Antonio as he witnesses the descent of common rural worker Manuel into a life of crime, joining the gang of Antonio's sworn enemy, Corisco the Blond Devil (Othon Bastos), and the Pedra Bonita Massacre. [12 pages]
- Written by Cristian Redferne




Fig. 28
 Kafka, Franz  (b. Prague, Bohemia, 1883-1924). The Hunger Artist  (Ein Hungerkunstler), 1922

A short story by Franz Kafka first published in Die neue Rundschau in 1922. The story was also included in the collection A Hunger Artist (Ein Hungerkünstler), the last book Kafka prepared for publication, printed by Verlag Die Schmiede after Kafka's death. The protagonist, a hunger artist who experiences the decline in appreciation of his craft, is an archetypical creation of Kafka: an individual marginalized and victimized by society at large. The title of the story has been translated also to "A Fasting Artist" and "A Starvation Artist".
The key to the hunger artist’s character lies in his identity as a professional faster, and at the center of his dedication to the perfection of his art is his ambition to achieve something that no one has ever achieved before. The hunger that the hunger artist willfully endures has a double meaning: it refers to his vocation of fasting as well as his insatiable yearning to defy human imagination by fasting indefinitely. Driven to renounce the nourishment that the rest of humanity embraces, the hunger artist literally lives in self-denial, forsaking comfort, companionship, and, most important, food, all of which are necessary to survival. Thus, the hunger artist’s devotion to his art constitutes a thinly masked death wish. Unwilling to respond to the needs he has as a human being, let alone as a living thing, the hunger artist makes death the culmination of his life’s work.
The hunger artist is doomed to be unhappy because he depends on others’ understanding to validate his performance, which is, by his own description, “beyond human imagination.” He feels deep disdain for his spectators, but because the nature of performance art requires spectators, the hunger artist is tied to the people he seeks to evade. He is, in a sense, a misfit in a showman’s position, and he comes to depend on the praise and wide-eyed amazement of his spectators as if they themselves were the food of life. When he experiences their suspicion, cynicism, and indifference, he becomes frustrated, unable to understand that being an artist often means being alienated from others. Only at the end of his life does the hunger artist seem to approach an understanding of the paradox that defines his existence. At this point, he no longer thinks that “the world [is] cheating him of his reward,” but rather that his aspirations could never be rewarded in the world in which he lives. 

Fig. 29  
 Inuit Art.  Survival
Inuit Art from the collection of Dr Samuel Wagonfeld and his wife Sally Allen



 FIG. 30    Beggar,  Hoboken, N.J.,




Fig. 31

O’Donnel, Bridget  (b.Galway Island, 1860 –Liverpool, 1949) Eviction - Irish Potato Famine Memorial
My work is heavily influenced by my interest in abstraction, expression, and the “grammar” of art making. Through abstraction, I explore the possibilities for the basic elements of an image to articulate details of the human condition. By sensitively engaging the visual potential of line, writing, pattern, space, etc., my works articulate a kind of rhythm, vibration, or sensation. It is through this use of abstraction that my works take on an intense, often transcendent beauty.



Fig. 32

El Salahai Ibraham  (b. Sudan, 1930 -)  Dry Months of the Fast, Sudan, 1962
     El-Salahi was born on September 5, 1930, in Omdurman, Sudan.
He is considered a pioneer in Sudanese art and was a member of the "Khartoum School" that was founded by Osman Waqialla. In the 1960s he was associated with the Mbari Club in Ibadan, Nigeria.



Fig. 33   Beckman Max (b.Leipzig, 1884 – 1950) die Holle (hell), 1919
plate 5, from Die Hole, 1919

Fig. 34
Marsh, Reginald  (b. Paris, 1898 – 1954) Bread Line  “No one has starved”, 1932

Fig. 35

BELOW: Sofia Nalepinska-Boichuk. "Famine," 1927
woodcut on paper, 33 c 25 cm.
collection of the National Art Museum of Ukraine, Kyiv
("The Phenomenon of the Ukrainian Avant-garde" [Winnipeg: Winnipeg Art Gallery, 2001], ill. 39)


 Fig. 36
Vladimirov, Ivan
Starvation in Petrograd, 1918


"IMAES ND EVOCATIONS OF THE FAMINE-GENOCIDE IN UKRAINIAN ART"
   Fig. 37  Kollwitz, Kathe  Hunger in post WW l Germany







Fig. 38    Fäderneslandet, 1867
  

Illustration of starvation in northern Sweden
Date
1867
Source
Ett satans år, book from Sveriges Radios förlag
Author
Fäderneslandet, old Swedish newspaper

Fig. 38

Between 1866 and 1868, Finland and northern Sweden experienced a dramatic famine, during which approximately 15 % of the inhabitants perished.

The harvest failure, and the subsequent winter was particularly harsh. The harvest of 1867 was also largely destroyed by inclement weather. This sketch published in the newspaper Fäderneslandet shows the efforts of a starving family to feed itself with tree bark and leather. The situation only began to return to normal from 1868. [Wikipedia]

Fig. 39

Doyle, Richard

 

Punch and Judy "Union is Strength."
   Punch was a popular magazine in 19th century Britain, touching on politics, culture humor and satire
  This cartoon, appearing October 17, 1846, was drawn by Richard Doyle. England is giving a basket of bread and a shovel to the Irish peasant ... as if that would be a solution.


Categories Politics, culture, humour, satire
Frequency Weekly
Founder Henry Mayhew, Ebenezer Landells
Year founded 1841
First issue 17 July 1841
Final issue 2002



Fig. 40

Caglecartoons.com

Fig. 41
Ensor, James  (b.1860 -1949, Belgium) Banquet of the Starved, 1915


Fig. 42
Stailand, Charles J.   Feeding the Hungry, London, 1880

 Fig. 43

Fildes, Sir Samuel Luke,  Homeless and Hungry, 1869
 KCVO, RA (3 October 1843 – 28 February 1927) was an English painter and illustrator born at Liverpool and trained in the South Kensington and Royal Academy schools.  


Fig. 44
Goya, Francisco, 1863
"Enterrar y callar" (Bury them and keep quiet). Atrocities, starvation and human degradation described as the "prodigious flowering of rage".




Fig. 45   FILM   EATING, 1990  Written and directed by HENRY JAGLOM

A group of young and middle-aged women gather for the birthday party of a friend and talk about their lives and food they cook for their husbands, boyfriends, or themselves.What we call fasting for social puposes rather than spiritual.

Review: 

     This film, as important as it is, is seldom listed in lists of "popular" food films  For all its frivolity, there as a deep and serous message for America. 

     One has to wonder about Henry Jaglom's mother, when he dedicates a film about women suffering from eating disorders to her. This is one of Jaglom's more successful efforts since there is some dramatic conflict amongst the cinema verite talkfest that is his trademark. One might even mistake this film as a documentary with all the to-the-camera discourse. 

     Otherwise his camera is thankfully still, aided by the excuse of a Frenchwoman making a documentary at an exclusively female (and enormously populated) birthday party. Maybe it's a very "L.A." thing but it's shocking how so many beautiful women have food issues, and the association they make with food and sex, and food and love, makes for a compelling (for Jaglom) social study. He begins uncertainly, as the women gather.                  
 STARS:, , | See full cast & crew »